Venezuela

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Venezuela

Innlegg QIQrrr 17 Aug 2013, 17:42

En fortsettelse av tråden Venezuela under Chaves ― arven etter Chavez:

    CentralBanking.com, August 14, 2013: Steve Hanke, a professor of economics at Johns Hopkins University in the US and chief economic adviser in the mid-1990s to the then president of Venezuela, Rafael Caldera, told CentralBanking.com that a change at the top of the central bank will be “completely irrelevant” to the problems faced by Venezuela’s economy – chief among them annual inflation running at almost 240%, according to the Troubled Currencies Project, which Hanke runs in conjunction with the Cato Institute. Hanke said the central bank is seen in Venezuela as a fourth source of funding for the government, after oil revenues, tax collection and the bond market – none of which have the capacity to fund the level of social spending enacted by Maduro’s government, in the same vein as the late Hugo Chavez before him - Venecuela central bank head replaced amid corruption claims

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"Atlas was permitted the opinion that he was at liberty, if he wished, to drop the Earth and creep away; but this opinion was all that he was permitted" - Franz Kafka
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg QIQrrr 27 Okt 2013, 18:00

Sikkert billigere enn den norske modellen:

    BBC, October 26, 2013: Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has announced the creation of a new Ministry of Supreme Social Happiness. Mr Maduro says the agency will co-ordinate the anti-poverty programmes created by the late President Hugo Chavez, but others suspect the move is purely political, coming six weeks before municipal elections. The country has inflation of almost 50% and suffers from chronic shortages of basic goods such as staple foods and toilet roll - Venezuela to create 'ministry of happiness'

Ifølge FN er Venezuela det lykkeligste landet i Syd-Amerika...
Børge Svanstrøm Amundsen

"Atlas was permitted the opinion that he was at liberty, if he wished, to drop the Earth and creep away; but this opinion was all that he was permitted" - Franz Kafka
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg PAMENTAS 24 Nov 2013, 13:48

aftenposten.no skrev:Presidentens tilhengere roser hans krig mot «kapitalistiske parasitter». Andre mener han skaper nye problemer.

Dagen etter at nasjonalforsamlingen tidligere denne uken ga presidenten ekstraordinære fullmakter til å styre ved dekret, det vil si uten samtykke fra de folkevalgte, satte regjeringen straks i gang med å bekjempe den galopperende inflasjonen og mangelen på basisvarer i butikkene.

Men når Maduro på denne måten fordyper det sosialistiske eksperimentet som hans avdøde forgjenger Hugo Chávez innledet, fører presidenten landet inn på en uviss kurs. Økonomer og politiske analytikere sier dette kan gjøre situasjonen langt verre.

Blant hans planer er å begrense fortjenestemarginene i flere sektorer av økonomien, et tiltak analytikerne sier er mer radikalt enn den politikken Chavez førte.

...
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg nico 13 Jan 2015, 16:47

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/ ... QE20150112

Venezuelan shortages, long lines spark violence, arrests

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People show numbers written on their arms with the order they should enter at the state-run Bicentenario supermarket in Maracaibo January 11, 2015.

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People wait before sunrise to enter the state-run Bicentenario supermarket in Maracaibo January 11, 2015.


(Reuters) - At least a dozen protesters arrested in Venezuela remained in jail on Monday and masked assailants burned a bus amid scattered unrest over swelling lines for basic goods, activists said.

Police rounded up 16 people for protesting outside stores over the weekend, according to the opposition MUD coalition, which said four of them were released shortly after.

Rights group Penal Forum said 18 protesters were still behind bars on Monday. The government did not confirm that.

Venezuela is suffering from chronic shortages of goods ranging from diapers to flour that have worsened since an ebb in deliveries over Christmas. The scarcity has forced shoppers across Venezuela to line up in front of stores before dawn.

The MUD also accused soldiers posted outside shops of banning photos of the lines, which can snake around blocks.

"Not only is the government forcing people to get into humiliating queues ... it also wants the lines to be Cuban-style, silent and terrified," said MUD chief Jesus Torrealba.

On Saturday, an explosive device was thrown into a building of the state phone company Cantv in southeastern Puerto Ordaz city, burning eight vehicles, the government said. In western San Cristobal, six masked men threw a Molotov cocktail into a parked bus belonging to a university, students said on Monday.

National Assembly President Diosdado Cabello on Monday condemned what he called a strategy by enemies of the revolution to foment unrest in queues and called on Venezuelans to resist "provocations."

While the scattered unrest is a far cry from massive demonstrations that rocked the country for four months in 2014, it comes amid growing frustration over the economic crisis.

President Nicolas Maduro, whose popularity has plunged, says right-wing agitators and Venezuela's elite are trying to topple him via an "economic war."

"At the start of this year the parasitical oligarchy ambushed us but we and the people are responding," he said at the weekend from Saudi Arabia.

In the last week, Maduro and his closest ministers have visited China, Russia and other oil producing countries to seek financing and OPEC action on tumbling oil prices.

"This is an emergency, it's not the time for photos of Maduro doing tourism in China," said Henrique Capriles, who narrowly lost a presidential election to Maduro in 2013.

"I think it's time for our people to protest in the street."

Critics blame Venezuela's recession on socialist policies such as 12-year-old exchange control system, one that fails to provide enough hard currency for imports.

State-run supermarkets have started restricting access based on identity cards. Only Venezuelans whose card number ends in 0 or 1 were allowed to shop on Monday, local media reported.

(Additional reporting by Corina Pons and Diego Ore; Writing by Alexandra Ulmer; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne, Alan Crosby and Steve Orlofsky)
You can't put an "I wish" over an "It is"

- Leonard Peikoff
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg nico 15 Jan 2015, 15:44

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/ ... IS20150114


Night lines banned at shops in some Venezuela states; scarcity persists


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People line up outside a supermarket to buy toilet paper in Caracas January 12, 2015.




(Reuters) - Governors in three Venezuelan states have banned overnight queuing amid huge and sometimes rowdy lines around shops across the scarcity-plagued country.

Shortages of basic consumer products from milk to toilet paper have worsened since a lull in distribution over the Christmas and New Year holidays, prompting many to wait from the early hours on foot - or in hammocks - before shops open.

The ubiquitous lines and frequent jostling for places when shop doors finally open are an embarrassment and irritation to Venezuelans across the political spectrum.

There have also been scattered protests and arrests.

"We are going to prohibit lines outside commercial establishments," Falcon state governor Stella Lugo said late on Tuesday. "Security forces have been instructed."

She joined two other governors, in the states of Bolivar and Yaracuy, who have announced the same measure in recent days.

"Nighttime lines are dangerous for the people," said Bolivar Governor Francisco Rangel.

In some places, officials are also limiting access to shops to particular days according to Venezuelans' identity card numbers.

The shortages have hurt the popularity of President Nicolas Maduro, which hit 22 percent in December, according to local pollster Datanalisis.

Foes say 15 years of "Bolivarian socialism" under his rule and that of his predecessor Hugo Chavez are to blame for Venezuela's economic recession, the highest inflation in the Americas, and shortages.

But Maduro, 52, says a wealthy elite and opposition activists encouraged by Washington and foreign media are seeking an "economic coup" via hoarding and price-gouging.

"It's a strategy to try and upset the people and turn them to extremes, to destabilize the country," Maduro told the Telesur TV network late on Tuesday during a visit to Algeria.

Maduro has been visiting China, Russia and other countries to seek financing as well as action from the OPEC grouping on tumbling crude prices which have exacerbated Venezuela's economic malaise.

In his absence, opposition leaders have been seeking to overcome internal differences and forge a unified strategy against Maduro. On Wednesday, key opposition figures called for peaceful mobilizations in the coming days.

Violence at protests last year caused the deaths of 43 people, including demonstrators, government supporters and security forces.

"This thing they called revolution is over ... This government and this project are in a terminal phase," Henrique Capriles, a former presidential candidate, told reporters.

Jailed protest leader Leopoldo Lopez, in a joint statement with two fellow hardline opposition leaders, called for Maduro's resignation.

"Venezuela's problem is not $40 oil. It's the Maduro government's corruption and incompetence and the unviable Cuban model they impose on us," they said.

(Writing by Andrew Cawthorne; editing by Diego Ore and G Crosse)
You can't put an "I wish" over an "It is"

- Leonard Peikoff
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg nico 17 Jan 2015, 00:45

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/ ... L320150116

Venezuela's 'protest city' on edge as economic crisis worsens


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Students block a street as they clash with national guards during a protest against the government in San Cristobal January 14, 2015.

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Masked students block a street as they clash with national guards during a protest against the government in San Cristobal January 14, 2015.

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Students clash with national guards during a protest against the government in San Cristobal January 14, 2015.

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National guards control the entrance of a private supermarket as people line up to enter in San Cristobal January 15, 2015.

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People line up to buy basic goods at a supermarket in San Cristobal January 14, 2015.

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A man is detained by police during a protest against the government in San Cristobal January 15, 2015.

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Masked students block a street during a protest against the government in San Cristobal January 14, 2015.

(Reuters) - Masked youths are once again blocking streets and burning tires in the Venezuelan city of San Cristobal, the epicenter of last year's massive anti-government protests.

The groups are small and the unrest contained, but dissent is rising in this volatile Andean city, a barometer of frustration with nationwide shortages that are putting pressure on the socialist government of Nicolas Maduro.

Students, who also accuse the government of corruption and repression but whom Maduro labels "coupsters," are threatening to unleash larger demonstrations again.

"It's time," Deiby Jaimes, 21, said from behind a barricade of burning trash as police gazed down from their hilltop perch. "There's a social, economic and political crisis. Economically we're completely lost and in a delirium."

But Jaimes and other students said they were restraining themselves to see if other Venezuelans also take to the streets.

Last year's protests split the opposition and failed to attract widespread support from Venezuela's poor, meaning mainstream anti-government leaders like Henrique Capriles are calling for less radical tactics including peaceful rallies and a good showing at an upcoming parliamentary vote.

"People are scared," said Jaimes, an accounting student, as dozens around him knocked rocks together menacingly. "But fear is disappearing due to shortages. We're expecting a social explosion."

High demand and a Christmas lull in distribution have aggravated shortages across the nation of 30 million people. Queues sometimes snake around entire blocks, prompting isolated scuffles for coveted milk or diapers.

Although there has been scattered violence around the OPEC nation, many eyes are once again on the opposition hotbed of San Cristobal, where clusters of demonstrators have been facing off with security forces since the New Year.

It was here that the attempted rape of a student last year prompted protests that spread into a wave of national demonstrations.

Major General Efrain Velasco Lugo, who is in charge of security for the western Andean region, called the protesters misguided delinquents. "They want to torch the city again."

Their motto, he added, can be boiled down to "because I think differently to you, I'm going to topple you."

Indeed, Maduro says right-wing foes, encouraged by the United States and compliant foreign media, are plotting an "economic coup" to topple his socialist government. Protesters retort they are decrying flawed policies, like currency controls that have crimped imports and led to shortages.

Army officials said on Thursday 18 protesters had been arrested in San Cristobal, capital of Tachira state, in the last 10 days, with six currently behind bars.

Rights group Penal Forum said 56 demonstrators were arrested nationally this year, with most now released.

A national guard shot a protester in the chest on Thursday night during clashes in San Cristobal, a student leader said. Reuters could not immediately verify the information.

The situation remains a far cry from unrest between February and May that left 43 dead and hundreds injured during the biggest disturbances in more than a decade. Victims included demonstrators, government supporters and security officials.

COMBATIVE 'CORDIAL CITY'

Still, the mood is increasingly combative in San Cristobal, traditionally known as the "cordial city," as life becomes a series of queues.

Taxi driver Luis Perez wakes up around 5 a.m. to wait in line for gasoline.

"We produce so much oil, and look how we're suffering," he said as he finally filled up his creaking blue 1982 Chevrolet.

"We need a change of government," he added before paying less than 2 cents a liter for the world's cheapest gasoline.

Roughly 15 percent of fuel in Tachira is smuggled out of the state, estimates Nellyver Lugo, a ruling party state legislator who heads a commission on gasoline. Lack of spare parts for trucks and tricky contract negotiations reduced supplies this year, she added.

Up to 25 percent of food is smuggled out for sale at a hefty profit in Colombia, the army says, citing discoveries of subsidized flour stashed in tires or rice in engines.

Even once-fervent "Chavistas" are becoming skeptical as inflation and shortages threaten anti-poverty advances under the late Hugo Chavez's 1999-2013 rule.

"There was a lot of hope, but things didn't pan out the way we wanted," Ronald, a government employee who would not give his last name, said as he stood in line clutching scarce toilet paper. "Now we're paying the price. I hope they implement changes."

But Maduro, whose approval levels have steadily eroded since his 2013 election, has so far balked at implementing pressing but unpopular measures such as raising gasoline prices or unifying a baffling three-tiered currency control system.

Sinking oil prices have compounded Venezuela's cash crunch, prompting fears that the nation may have to default. An impending national parliamentary election has raised the stakes further.

With Maduro out of the country for the last 10 days on an apparently unsuccessful trip to lobby for an oil supply cut, Venezuela's perennially fragmented opposition is scrambling to unite and call for peaceful protests.

"The government is weaker," 24-year-old student leader Reinaldo Manrique said, standing next to a charred bus near the University of the Andes.

"It won't survive an explosion like last year's."



You can't put an "I wish" over an "It is"

- Leonard Peikoff
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg nico 02 Feb 2015, 07:12

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/02/ ... 2O20150202

Venezuela jails store owners accused of creating queues: Maduro

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People line up outside a state-run Bicentenario supermarket in Caracas January 9, 2015.

(Reuters) - Venezuela has jailed the owners of an unnamed chain of shops accused of engineering queues to whip up anger with the socialist government, President Nicolas Maduro said on Sunday.

Chronic shortages of basic goods, including flour, chicken and diapers, have triggered massive lines that sometimes stretch around blocks and have become a nightmare to navigate for Venezuelans.

Most economists blame the scarcity on currency controls that restrict dollars for imports, as well as falling domestic production.

Maduro, however, accuses a rapacious business elite of waging an "economic war" to bring down his administration.

"Yesterday we detected that a famous chain of stores was conspiring, irritating the people," Maduro told a crowd of red-clad supporters and soldiers.

"We came, we normalized sales, we summoned the owners, we arrested them and they're prisoners for having provoked the people," he said to cheers, adding that the state would take over the food stores.

The stores purposefully reduced the number of cashiers to create lines, Maduro said earlier on Sunday, likening the strategy to a "guerrilla tactic."

Authorities are also pressing charges against Venezuelan pharmacy chain Farmatodo for not opening enough check-out counters. Its executives have been summoned for questioning.

The government has jailed businessmen in the past for raising prices, and has launched several campaigns designed to combat contraband of price-controlled goods flowing to neighboring Colombia.

"Those who use their stores to hurt the people will pay with jail time," said Maduro, donning a tracksuit with his name sewn on and a camouflage hat.

Critics say cracking down on businesses risks aggravating shortages and further deters investment.

They have also lampooned Maduro for not pushing through major structural changes to combat the country's recession, over 60 percent inflation, and shaky finances.

Maduro, who won an election to replace his mentor, the late Hugo Chavez, in 2013, added he secretly toured the capital Caracas for four hours on Saturday with his wife and close adviser Cilia Floresto to survey the situation at stores.

(Writing by Alexandra Ulmer. Editing by Andre Grenon)
You can't put an "I wish" over an "It is"

- Leonard Peikoff
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg PAMENTAS 05 Mar 2015, 14:21

PAMENTAS
 
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg Rounin 08 Mar 2015, 10:42

Venezuela to install finger scanners to tackle shortages

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuela will begin installing 20,000 fingerprint scanners at supermarkets nationwide in a bid to stamp out hoarding and panic buying, which the government blames for long lines and widespread shortages of basic goods.

...
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg Rounin 03 Mai 2015, 10:48

Venezuela to nationalize food distribution
Caracas (AFP) - Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has promised to nationalize food distribution in the South American nation beset with record shortages of basic goods, runaway inflation and an escalating economic crisis.


Yup. :|
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg nico 07 Aug 2015, 18:47

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/08/ ... 1420150806

Looting and violence on the rise in Venezuela supermarkets

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People queue to buy staple items in a Mercal, a subsidized state-run street market, in Caracas August 4, 2015. Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

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People queue outside a state-run Bicentenario supermarket as they wait to buy staple items, in Caracas August 4, 2015.
Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins


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People queue to buy staple items outside state-run Bicentenario supermarket in Caracas August 4, 2015.
Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins


Venezuelan supermarkets are increasingly being targeted by looters as swollen lines and prolonged food shortages spark frustration in the OPEC nation struggling with an economic crisis.

Shoppers routinely spend hours in lines to buy consumer staples ranging from corn flour to laundry soap, turning lines into venues for shoving matches and now more frequent attempts to plunder shops.

The economic crisis has hit President Nicolas Maduro's approval ratings and raised tension levels in the country.

Fifty-six incidents of looting and 76 looting attempts took place in the first half of 2015, according local NGO Venezuelan Observatory of Social Conflict, which based the figures on media reports and testimony of observers around the country.

On Sunday, a small crowd in the western city of San Cristobal pushed its way into the government-run Bicentenario supermarket to grab products after it had closed, leaving staff scratched and bruised, according to store manager Edward Perez.

"As we were closing, a group of 20 people unexpectedly started shouting insults at the government and the workers," said Perez in a telephone interview.

Several looters were arrested after the fracas, which Perez blamed on "ultra-right-wing sectors of the opposition" seeking to sow violence.

Last Friday, one man was killed and 60 were arrested in Ciudad Guayana in southern Venezuela after shops were looted.

The government did not respond to a request for comment on the lootings but Maduro calls the shortages and the unrest a product of an opposition-led "economic war".

More frequent than these serious events are minor melees that ensue when delivery trucks arrive at stores carrying prized products such as chicken or milk.

But the combination of limited official information and exaggerated rumors propagated via Twitter often makes it difficult to distinguish between the two.

KNIFED IN LINE

Lines have been noticeably longer since the start of the year, and have been especially tense since last Friday's incident in Ciudad Guayana.

"There's no organization, they treat you like an animal, they don't respect anything," said Carmen Neskowi, 49, who identified her profession as "standing in line," in a queue outside a Caracas supermarket. "It's an insult."

The problems, however, have not spurred a broader wave of protests like those led by the opposition in early 2014 that left 43 people dead.

Supporters of the ruling Socialist Party note that the network of subsidized state-run grocery stores created by late president Hugo Chavez and financed by plentiful oil revenue helped reduce poverty and hunger during his 1999-2013 rule.

But the combination of dysfunctional currency controls, which have limited Venezuela's capacity to import, and the end of a decade-long oil boom has left Maduro's government strapped for cash and struggling to maintain the largesse.

According to polls, his party is expected to do poorly in legislative elections later this year, its support hit by high inflation, the currency's collapse and food shortages.

Local food producers ranging from neighborhood bakeries to an industrial pasta maker have halted or slowed operations for lack of raw materials or machine parts.

Obtaining low-cost food and medicine, once the hallmark of the Chavez era, has become a daily struggle.

Lines are increasingly filled with smugglers who buy subsidized goods and resell them at a profit on the black market or in neighboring Colombia, generating tension between resellers and those trying to stock their own kitchens.

Josefa Bracho, a 70-year-old teacher in the central city of Barquisimeto, vows not to stand in any more supermarket lines. She was slashed in the thigh with a scalpel after a dispute in a line with women she believed were smugglers.

"We'd been in line for almost four hours when three women got in front of me," said Bracho in a telephone interview.

"I said 'What are you doing? Why are you cutting in line?' Later one came by and cut my leg ... Standing in line means putting my life in danger."
You can't put an "I wish" over an "It is"

- Leonard Peikoff
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg Vegard Martinsen 25 Feb 2016, 08:34

http://caracaschronicles.com/2014/02/20 ... e-changed/

The Game Changed in Venezuela Last Night – and the International Media Is Asleep At the Switch


By Francisco Toro -

February 20, 2014
Dear International Editor:

Listen and understand. The game changed in Venezuela last night. What had been a slow-motion unravelling that had stretched out over many years went kinetic all of a sudden.

What we have this morning is no longer the Venezuela story you thought you understood.

Throughout last night, panicked people told their stories of state-sponsored paramilitaries on motorcycles roaming middle class neighborhoods, shooting at people and storming into apartment buildings, shooting at anyone who seemed like he might be protesting.

People continue to be arrested merely for protesting, and a long established local Human Rights NGO makes an urgent plea for an investigation into widespread reports of torture of detainees. There are now dozens of serious human right abuses: National Guardsmen shooting tear gas canisters directly into residential buildings. We have videos of soldiers shooting civilians on the street.

And that’s just what came out in real time, over Twitter and YouTube, before any real investigation is carried out. Online media is next, a city of 645,000 inhabitants has been taken off the internet amid mounting repression, and this blog itself has been the object of a Facebook “block” campaign.

What we saw were not “street clashes”, what we saw is a state-hatched offensive to suppress and terrorize its opponents.

Here at Caracas Chronicles we’re doing what it can to document the crisis, but there’s only so much one tiny, zero-budget blog can do.

After the major crackdown on the streets of large (and small) Venezuelan cities last night, I expected some kind of response in the major international news outlets this morning. I understand that with an even bigger and more photogenic freakout ongoing in an even more strategically important country, we weren’t going to be front-page-above-the-fold, but I’m staggered this morning to wake up, scan the press and find…

Nothing.

As of 11 a.m. this morning, the New York Times World Section has…nothing
Vegard Martinsen
 
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Re: Venezuela

Innlegg Ultima_Thule 19 Mai 2017, 20:50

Video: HUGO CHAVEZ SUPERPRISER
För folkets charmige hjälte räcker det inte med revolutionära pangpriser. I Chavez version av "gissa priset" är det korrekta svaret: att du ska passa dig jävligt noga om du försöker göra vinst.
Vill du lära dig varför inflation och priskontroller alltid går ut över den lilla människan först?
http://mises.se/tag/inflation
Ultima_Thule
 
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