Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Diskusjon om teknologi, teknologiske fremskritt, ny vitenskap, etc.

Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Vegard Martinsen 15 Feb 2010, 13:32

Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk "The Logical Leap: Inducton in Physics" kommer 6. juli.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0451230051/ref=cm_sw_su_dp

Her er blurben:

A groundbreaking solution to the problem of induction,
based on Ayn Rand's theory of concepts

Inspired by and expanding on a series of lectures by Leonard Peikoff, David Harriman presents a fascinating answer to the problem of induction--that is, the epistemological question of how we know the truth of inductive generalizations.

Ayn Rand presented her revolutionary theory of concepts in her book Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology. As Dr. Peikoff subsequently explored inductive reasoning, he sought out David Harriman, a physicist who has taught philosophy, for his expert knowledge of the scientific discovery process.

Here, Harriman presents the result of collaboration between scientist and philosopher. Beginning with a detailed discussion of the role of mathematics and experiment in validating generalizations in physics--looking closely at the reasoning of scientists such as Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Lavoisier, and Maxwell--Harriman skillfully identifies the method by which we discover laws of nature. Refuting the skepticism that is epidemic in contemporary philosophy of science, Harriman offers demonstrable evidence of the power of reason. He then argues that philosophy itself is an inductive science--the science that teaches the scientist how to be scientific.


Her er innholdsfortegnelsen fra http://sites.google.com/site/thelogicalleap/home :

Contents

Introduction by Leonard Peikoff

Preface

1. The Foundation

The Nature of Concepts

Generalizations as Hierarchical

Perceiving First-Level Causal Connections

Conceptualizing First-Level Causal Connections

The Structure of Inductive Reasoning

2. Experimental Method

Galileo’s Kinematics

Newton’s Optics

The Methods of Difference and Agreement

Induction as Inherent in Conceptualization

3. The Mathematical Universe

The Birth of Celestial Physics

Mathematics and Causality

The Power of Mathematics

Proof of Kepler’s Theory

4. Newton’s Integration

The Development of Dynamics

The Discovery of Universal Gravitation

Discovery is Proof

5. The Atomic Theory

Chemical Elements and Atoms

The Kinetic Theory of Gases

The Unification of Chemistry

The Method of Proof

6. Causes of Error

Misapplying the Inductive Method

Abandoning the Inductive Method

7. The Role of Mathematics and Philosophy

Physics as Inherently Mathematical

The Science of Philosophy

An End—and a New Beginning

References

Index

og her er del av kapittel 1:

The Foundation

More than three centuries have passed since the scientific revolution culminated in the outstanding achievement of Isaac Newton. During that time, human life has been transformed by science and the technology springing from it.

Yet we find ourselves in a peculiar and unstable position. As our knowledge of the physical world has advanced, our understanding of knowledge itself has lagged behind. I witnessed this gap between physics and epistemology during my college years at the University of California, Berkeley. In my physics lab course, I learned how to determine the atomic structure of crystals by means of x-ray diffraction and how to identify subatomic particles by analyzing bubble-chamber photographs. In my philosophy of science course, on the other hand, I was taught by a world-renowned professor (Paul Feyerabend) that there is no such thing as scientific method and that physicists have no better claim to knowledge than voodoo priests. I knew little about epistemology at the time, but I could not help noticing that it was the physicists, not the witchdoctors, who had made possible the life-promoting technology we enjoy today.

The triumphs of science stand as a monument to the power of reason, and they stand as a clear refutation of the skepticism that is epidemic in contemporary philosophy of science. Why then does this situation persist in universities around the world? How did we arrive at this bizarre contradiction—with scientists developing technology that exploits our detailed knowledge of atomic structure, while philosophers bewail or revel in the alleged impotence of reason to grasp even relatively simple facts?

E. Bright Wilson, who was a professor of chemistry at Harvard, once stated the problem in this way:



Practical scientists who rashly allow themselves to listen to philosophers are likely to go away in a discouraged frame of mind, convinced that there is no logical foundation for the things they do, that all their alleged scientific laws are without justification, and that they are living in a world of naïve illusion. Of course, once they get out into the sunlight again, they know that this is not so, that scientific principles do work, bridges stay up, eclipses occur on schedule, and atomic bombs go off.

Nevertheless, it is very unsatisfactory that no generally acceptable theory of scientific inference has yet been put forward. . . . Mistakes are often made which would presumably not have been made if a consistent and satisfactory basic philosophy had been followed.1

The central issue here is the failure of philosophers to offer a solution to what has been called “the problem of induction.” Induction is the process of inferring generalizations from particular instances. The complementary process of applying generalizations to new instances is deduction. The theory of deductive reasoning was developed by Aristotle more than two millennia ago. This crucial achievement was a start toward understanding and validating knowledge, but it was only a start. Deduction presupposes induction; one cannot apply what one does not know or cannot conceive. The primary process of gaining knowledge that goes beyond perceptual data is induction. Generalization—the inference from some members of a class to all—is the essence of human cognition.

When we reason from “Men in my experience are mortal” to “All men are mortal”; or from “These fires burn me when touched” to “Fire by its nature burns”; or from “This apple and the moon obey the law of gravity” to “Every physical object in the universe obeys the law”—in all such cases, we are passing from one realm to another: from the observed to the unobserved; from the past behavior of nature to its future behavior; from what we discover in a narrow corner of a vast cosmos to what is true everywhere in that cosmos. This passage is the epistemological dividing line between man and animals.

Animals are perceptual-level organisms. They learn from experience, but only by highly delimited perceptual association. They cannot imagine the unobserved, the future, or the world beyond such associations. They know, deal with, and react to concretes, and only concretes. But this is not a level on which man can live and prosper. To act successfully in the present, a human being must set long-range goals and a long-range course of action; to do so, he must know the future—perhaps months ahead, often years, sometimes decades.

A generalization is a proposition that ascribes a characteristic to every member of an unlimited class, however it is positioned in space or time. In formal terms, it states: All S is P. This kind of claim, on any subject, goes beyond all possible observation.

But man is neither omniscient nor infallible. His generalizations, therefore, are not automatically correct. Thus the questions: How can man know, across the whole scale of space and time, facts which he does not and can never perceive? When and why is the inference from “some” to “all” legitimate? What is the method of valid induction that can prove the generalization to which it leads? In short, how can man determine which generalizations are true (correspond to reality), and which ones are false (contradict reality)?

The answer is crucial. If a man accepts a true generalization, his mental contents (to that extent) are consistent with one another, and his action, other things being equal, will succeed. But if a man accepts a false generalization, it introduces in his mind a contradiction with his authentic knowledge and a clash with reality, leading unavoidably to frustration and failure in his actions. Therefore the “problem of induction” is not merely a puzzle for academics—it is the problem of human survival.
Vegard Martinsen
 
Innlegg: 7867
Registrert: 07 Sep 2003, 12:07

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Per Arne Karlsen 15 Feb 2010, 19:45

Noen utdrag fra boken er tilgjengelige som artikler i The Objective Standard:

http://www.theobjectivestandard.com/topics/science-technology.asp
Per Arne Karlsen
 
Innlegg: 260
Registrert: 07 Sep 2003, 12:39
Bosted: Oslo

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Per Arne Karlsen 15 Feb 2010, 19:53

Harriman arbeider også med en annen bok, The Anti-Copernican Revolution. Han sier at "The book is concerned with the relationship between philosophy and physics, and it spans the period from Copernicus to the present."

Her er et utdrag:
http://www.theobjectivestandard.com/issues/2006-spring/enlightenment-science.asp
Per Arne Karlsen
 
Innlegg: 260
Registrert: 07 Sep 2003, 12:39
Bosted: Oslo

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Per Anton Rønning 22 Feb 2010, 23:03



Et lite klipp herfra:
Above all, Euler did for calculus what Euclid did for geometry. Neither man was the original discoverer, but each made an enormous contribution to his respective field and then presented the theory systematically. The comparison also highlights an interesting difference between the two men. Euclid was more the theorist concerned with logical foundations, whereas Euler was more the “practical” thinker so typical of the Enlightenment. Euler never lost sight of applications to the physical world, and such applications motivated his major innovations in mathematics.

Det er selvsagt ingen tvil om Eulers store bidrag til matematikken. Men Euler levde fra 1707 til 1783, og det har skjedd ting i matematikken siden da også.
Hvorfor nevner ikke Harriman Riemann (1826-1866) ? Newton/Leibnitz oppdaget integrealregningen, men det var Riemann som formulerte teknikkens moderne definisjon. Riemann krediteres også for å ha lagt det matematiske grunnlaget for generell relativitet. Så utviklingen stoppet ikke med Euler. (Gauss er også en matematiker man ikke kommer utenom, og der er enda flere)

Men Riemanns matematiske bidrag til generell relativitet kan kanskje være en grunn
til ikke å nevne ham? Hva vet jeg, men han burde nevnes. Relativitetsteorien står jo ikke sterkt blant objektivister, da den er fremkommet på "feil måte". La meg belyse dette poenget i det følgende:

I Harrimans bok (jeg har nå lest alle utdragene i The Objective Standard) er et utdrag fra kapittelet "The 19th-Century Atomic War".

Epistemology is the branch of philosophy that studies the nature of knowledge and man’s means of acquiring it. It answers such questions as: Do our abstract ideas derive from our perception of particulars in reality, or are such ideas (as Einstein claimed) “free inventions of the human mind”? Do abstractions refer to real things, or arbitrarily selected groups of “mental images”?


Dette er det kjernepunkt hvor jeg mener objektivismen kommer fullstendig til kort.
Hvis "our abstract ideas derive from our perception of particulars in reality,"
kan vi rett og slett ikke befatte oss med partikkelfysikk ut fra en objektivistisk epistemologisk tilnærming. Vi kan ikke befatte oss med noe som ikke kan avledes fra vår persepsjon (sansning) av virkeligheten. Men problemet er da at der er deler av virkeligheten som er skjult for oss rett og slett pga. objektenes fysiske størrelse, slik
at de ikke kan sanses, hvor gjerne vi enn ville.

Planck oppdaget kvantefysikken ikke ut fra persepsjon om spesielle hendelser i virkeligheten, men ut fra en teoretisk kalkulasjon der han til slutt måtte gjøre som Einstein hevdet, å gjøre oppfinnelser på fritt grunnlag inne i sitt hode.
Hans teori om varmestråling i form av bølger stemte ikke, og da var det bare en mulighet: Å begynne å tenke fritt: Hva kan dette være?
Så Planck brukte da sin intuisjon og sin fantasi til å tenke på ulike mulige modeller,
inntil han kom frem til resultatet: Varmestråler er ikke kontinuerlige bølger, men små diskontinuerlig "pakker" som beveger seg diskret (i hopp). Der er intet mellomstadium mellom kvantenivåene, de hopper fra en posisjon direkte til neste. Så han kan ha tenkt slik:
Hvis dette ikke er kontinuerlig som jeg trodde, kan det da være diskret? Ved å sette i gang en prosess med et tilfeldig utvalg av / (evt. bruk av informert gjetning på ) ulike mentale bilder kan man komme til korrekte erkjennelser om virkeligheten.
Dvs.: Erkjennelse kan komme ved hjelp av Einsteins metode. I dette tilfellet kan det ikke være andre alternativer.

Etter min mening er Planck det moteksempelet man trenger for å tilbakevise
at eneste vei til erkjennelse er persepsjon/observasjon av konkrete hendelser i virkeligheten.
Varme er en del av virkeligheten, men man kan ikke observere hvordan den stråler ut.
Man kan ikke se/høre/lukte varmekvantene.
Men mennesket er faktisk i stand til å tenke kreativt og konstruktivt og benytte mentale bilder som i utgangspunktet kan synes tilfeldig valgt. selv om de også kan være basert på god intuisjon. Nøytrinoer ble også oppdaget rent teoretisk som følge av matematiske kalkulasjoner, og de lar seg overhodet ikke observere direkte. Men kalkulasjonene viste at det måtte eksistere noen slike partikler, og de lot seg etter hvert observere indirekte, siden det sendes ut lys når de treffer andre atomkjerner.
Men for å observere trengs instrumenter. Og man kan ikke bygge instrumenter på måfå for å observere det sansemessig uobserverbare uten å ha dannet seg noen arbitrarily selected groups of “mental images” for å finne ut hva man skal lete etter, og hvordan. Når man til slutt kan fastslå at man har tenkt riktig, har man nådd ny erkjennelse. Man går motsatt til verks akkurat som man selger short i et finansmarked:
Man selger først, og så kjøper tilbake på en (forhåpentlig) lavere kurs.
Analogien blir at man tenker fritt først, for så å observere etterpå.
Mislykkes observasjonen/eller at den ikke gir det predikerte resultat, vet man også at den frie ideen var feil.

Derfor er det min oppfatning at hypotetisk deduksjon ikke kan erstattes av noe annet hva angår den sansemessig uobserverbare del av verden.

Etter mitt skjønn bør obkjektivistisk tenkning konsentrere seg om den sansbare del av verden, siden den så eksplisitt bygger på persepsjon/sansning av konkrete hendelser i virkeligheten. Men det synes som om fremstående personer i ARI (Peikoff) tar mål
av seg til å putte fysikken inn i denne sjablongen, og det må gå galt. For i dag må man for å få ny kunnskap innen fysikken konsentrere seg om den ikke sansbare del av virkeligheten, og da har man ingen a priori persepsjon å starte med. Det som forbauser meg er at dette åpenbare faktum ikke ser ut til å interessere toppledelsen i ARI det minste. Dette burde vært underkastet dyptgående analyse, men det ignoreres bare. Så da kommer assosiasjonen "kannestøpere" snikende inn i bevisstheten.
Dette gir også grunnlag for å mene at objektivistisk erkjennelsesteori, selv om den trar mål av seg til å være universell og altomfattende, kommer til kort.

Derfor virker det også hovmodig når Harriman (og nå også Peikoff) inntar en
besserwissewrholdning og erklærer alt det moderne fysikere driver med som korrumpert. Men selv klarer de ikke å fortelle leseren hvorfor hovedpremisset
[Do our] abstract ideas derive from our perception of particulars in reality....
også gjelder for det ikke persepserbare, slik at det setter hypotetisk deduksjon til side
som metode for å oppnå erkjennelse.

Etter å ha lest utdragene fra boken vil jeg ikke anskaffe den. Man kan umulig bli tilført interessant ny kunnskap med basis i en erkjennelsesteori med så klare begrensninger som den objektivistiske. Dessverre.
I've always found that the speed of the boss is the speed of the team.
Lee Iacocca
Per Anton Rønning
 
Innlegg: 3322
Registrert: 09 Sep 2003, 08:54
Bosted: Oslo

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Onarki 23 Feb 2010, 04:23

Ut i fra hva du skriver, Per-Anton, er det dessverre klart for meg at du har misforstått Harriman/Peikoff/Objektivismen ganske kraftig. Den delen av hypotetisk deduktiv metode som du beskriver er *overhodet* ikke i konflikt med induktiv logikk, heller tvert i mot.

1. La meg først korrigere en meget grunnleggende misforståelse: at noe er *utledet* av sansedata betyr IKKE at det må være direkte tilgjengelig for våre 5 sanser. Jeg aner ikke hvor du har fått den idéen fra men det vitner om en grunnleggende misforståelse av objektivismen. Abstraksjoner kan være utledet direkte fra sansene, men de aller fleste er bare indirekte utledet fra sansene, altså utledet fra abstraksjoner som er utledet fra abstraksjoner som er utledet fra sansene.

2. hypotetisk deduktiv metode starter ALDRI bare med rent tankespinn. Det starter med *observasjoner* (eller abstraksjoner utledet av observasjoner) som ikke stemmer overens med etablert teori. Med andre ord, det er ingen som plutselig setter seg ned og bare tenker på en ny ide for så og sjekke den i virkeligheten. Det er alltid som svar på et observert problem. Dette er identisk med den induktive metoden. På dette punktet er altså hypotetisk-deduktiv metode og induksjon helt like.

Videre er det INGENTING som tilsier at man ikke skal kunne være kreativ og lage seg hypoteser så lenge de er basert på eksisterende data, enten direkte eller indirekte. Einstein startet med observasjonen at lyshastigheten ser ut til å være uavhengig av observatørens hastighet. Dette var hans utgangspunkt og det var et helt riktig utgangspunkt for en induktiv analyse. Der hvor hypotetisk-deduktiv metode og induksjon skiller lag er at førstnevnte er bygget på den kantianske antakelsen om at universet som sådan er en uforståelig svart boks hvor "anything goes" mens induksjon bygger på antakelsen om at universet har identitet, A er A, ting er hva de er. Det er dette som er kjernen i debatten. En hypotetisk-deduksjonist vil kunne finne på å si at årsak/virkning kan kastes ut vinduet, mens en induksjonist ikke kan gjøre det fordi han bygger på premisset om han lever i et forståelig, logisk univers.
Onarki
 
Innlegg: 2249
Registrert: 03 Apr 2005, 14:13

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg QIQrrr 30 Nov 2010, 14:06

David Harriman, November 28, 2010: This spring, The Logical Leap will be a required text in a course on scientific method at Western Carolina University. And the book has already been used in a critical thinking course at Augsburg College in Minnesota - The Logical Leap Goes to College
Børge Svanstrøm Amundsen

"Atlas was permitted the opinion that he was at liberty, if he wished, to drop the Earth and creep away; but this opinion was all that he was permitted" - Franz Kafka
Brukerens avatar
QIQrrr
 
Innlegg: 4439
Registrert: 20 Mai 2004, 23:33

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg QIQrrr 01 Feb 2011, 07:32

David Harriman, January 31, 2011: Some of my academic critics have crossed the line by belittling the achievements of Galileo and Newton. They have not revealed anything about these great thinkers, but they have revealed a great deal about themselves - In Defense of Galileo and Newton
Børge Svanstrøm Amundsen

"Atlas was permitted the opinion that he was at liberty, if he wished, to drop the Earth and creep away; but this opinion was all that he was permitted" - Franz Kafka
Brukerens avatar
QIQrrr
 
Innlegg: 4439
Registrert: 20 Mai 2004, 23:33

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Cragfarm 13 Mai 2011, 21:48

Denne skal jeg lese. I dag lärer man i fysikktimene at materie kan bli til energi og omvendt. Bryter ikke dette med "a er a"?
Cragfarm
 
Innlegg: 202
Registrert: 20 Okt 2010, 18:10

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg QIQrrr 19 Mai 2011, 01:14

Cragfarm skrev:I dag lärer man i fysikktimene at materie kan bli til energi og omvendt. Bryter ikke dette med "a er a"?

Nei.
Børge Svanstrøm Amundsen

"Atlas was permitted the opinion that he was at liberty, if he wished, to drop the Earth and creep away; but this opinion was all that he was permitted" - Franz Kafka
Brukerens avatar
QIQrrr
 
Innlegg: 4439
Registrert: 20 Mai 2004, 23:33

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Cragfarm 25 Mai 2011, 05:32

Hvorfor ikke? Er ikke energi noe legemer har som følge av deres posisjon og/eller bevegelse?
Cragfarm
 
Innlegg: 202
Registrert: 20 Okt 2010, 18:10

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg QIQrrr 25 Mai 2011, 06:09

Jeg forstår ikke hva vedkommende mener/vil frem til.
Børge Svanstrøm Amundsen

"Atlas was permitted the opinion that he was at liberty, if he wished, to drop the Earth and creep away; but this opinion was all that he was permitted" - Franz Kafka
Brukerens avatar
QIQrrr
 
Innlegg: 4439
Registrert: 20 Mai 2004, 23:33

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Vegard Martinsen 25 Mai 2011, 06:40

QIQrrr skrev:Jeg forstår ikke hva vedkommende mener/vil frem til.


Man kan si at energi er fundamentalt noe som under visse forhold manifesterer seg som masse.

Da vil et objekt kunne endres slik at masse-andelen minker og energi-andelen øker, dog slik at summen vil være konstant.

Er ikke energi noe legemer har som følge av deres posisjon og/eller bevegelse?


og også fordi det bare er (i samsvar med formelen E=mc^2).
Vegard Martinsen
 
Innlegg: 7867
Registrert: 07 Sep 2003, 12:07

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg QIQrrr 25 Mai 2011, 06:44

Vegard Martinsen skrev:
QIQrrr skrev:Jeg forstår ikke hva vedkommende mener/vil frem til.


Man kan si at energi er fundamentalt noe som under visse forhold manifesterer seg som masse.

Da vil et objekt kunne endres slik at masse-andelen minker og energi-andelen øker, dog slik at summen vil være konstant.

...og dette er på ingen måte i konflikt med identitetsloven.
Børge Svanstrøm Amundsen

"Atlas was permitted the opinion that he was at liberty, if he wished, to drop the Earth and creep away; but this opinion was all that he was permitted" - Franz Kafka
Brukerens avatar
QIQrrr
 
Innlegg: 4439
Registrert: 20 Mai 2004, 23:33

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Cragfarm 25 Mai 2011, 10:29

Vegard Martinsen skrev:Man kan si at energi er fundamentalt noe som under visse forhold manifesterer seg som masse.


OK, jeg har alltid tenkt på energi som en egenskap ved fysiske systemer (evnen til å utføre arbeid), og ikke som noe fysisk som kan eksistere alene.

Da vil et objekt kunne endres slik at masse-andelen minker og energi-andelen øker, dog slik at summen vil være konstant.


Med konstant lyshastighet må jo massen øke når energien øker (E=mc^2)!
Cragfarm
 
Innlegg: 202
Registrert: 20 Okt 2010, 18:10

Re: Peikoff/Harrimans bok om induksjon i fysikk

Innlegg Vegard Martinsen 25 Mai 2011, 12:16

Cragfarm skrev:
Vegard Martinsen skrev:Man kan si at energi er fundamentalt noe som under visse forhold manifesterer seg som masse.


OK, jeg har alltid tenkt på energi som en egenskap ved fysiske systemer (evnen til å utføre arbeid), og ikke som noe fysisk som kan eksistere alene.


Er ikke sikker på om det er riktig å si at energi kan eksistere alene.

Da vil et objekt kunne endres slik at masse-andelen minker og energi-andelen øker, dog slik at summen vil være konstant.


Med konstant lyshastighet må jo massen øke når energien øker (E=mc^2)!


Vel, ja, dette er kinetisk energi, men også: partikler kan "miste" masse, og den massen de mister finner man da igjen som energi i samsvar med formelen.
Vegard Martinsen
 
Innlegg: 7867
Registrert: 07 Sep 2003, 12:07

Neste

Gå til Teknologi og vitenskap

Hvem er i forumet

Brukere som leser i dette forumet: Ingen registrerte brukere og 1 gjest

cron