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Diskusjon om psykologi, epistemologi og metafysikk (fri vilje, begrepsdannelse, o.l.).

Rettigheter

Innlegg Panther 09 Jun 2011, 16:16

http://www.capitalismmagazine.com/law/privacy/6440-is-facebook-invading-your-right-to-privacy.html

Is Facebook Invading Your Right to Privacy?
9 June 2011 Amy Peikoff

As it stands, our legal protection for privacy rests upon a “right” to privacy that is no more than a permission...

Recently Facebook has been rolling out its new face-recognition tool, which will, unless deactivated by a user, automatically suggest that user’s name to his friends tagging photos they have recently uploaded. A technologically impressive feature, very convenient. Not surprisingly, however, politicians and commentators are expressing concerns that this tool, and particularly the fact that the tool is automatically turned on, constitutes an invasion of privacy of Facebook users.

I believe that, ironically, it is the legal right to privacy that is most to blame here.

As I’ve argued in my academic articles, I think the best way of legally protecting states of privacy is via our rights to property and contract. As it stands, our legal protection for privacy rests upon a “right” to privacy that is no more than a permission: the legal test makes protection for privacy dependent on whether others in society deem your expectation of privacy to be “reasonable.” The test is non-objective, which means its application is up to the whim of whichever judge or bureaucrat is applying it. The right to privacy has been essentially this way since its inception. Warren and Brandeis, in the famous 1890 Harvard Law Review article that is credited with giving birth to the right to privacy, insisted that the right was not absolute, that it had to be balanced against the public interest.
Ken-G. Johansen.
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Panther
 
Innlegg: 885
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Let's Spread the Wealth Around -- to Drug Addicts

Innlegg Panther 10 Jul 2011, 16:32

http://www.capitalismmagazine.com/politics/6480-let-s-spread-the-wealth-around-to-drug-addicts.html

5 July 2011 Michael Hurd

How constitutional is it to force some citizens to pay the incomes of other citizens -- drug-abusing citizens, or not?

Saying that it is “unfair for taxpayers to continue to foot the bill for welfare recipients who participate in illicit drug activity,” Florida Governor Rick Scott has signed into law a controversial drug screening law for those applying for welfare, according to CNN. “It’s the right thing for citizens of this state that need public assistance. We don’t want to waste tax dollars. And also, we want to give people an incentive to not use drugs,” said Scott.

Under the law, those applying for welfare will undergo drug screening and will be responsible for the cost of the testing. They would, however, recoup the cost if they are approved and pass the screening.

Those parents who have a positive drug test, however, could designate another person to receive benefits on behalf of the children.

Shortly after the bill was signed, five Democrats from the state’s congressional delegation issued a joint statement attacking the legislation, one calling it “downright unconstitutional.”

Unconstitutional? Oh, really? How constitutional is it to force some citizens to pay the incomes of other citizens -- drug-abusing citizens, or not? This is the REAL question that is never raised, and never will be raised, but should be.

Liberals and civil libertarians are right to be concerned about government prying into the drug use of private citizens. People have a political right to destroy their lives with drugs if they wish to do so, and in a free country they are left free to do so. But they don't have the right to do so on another's dime -- or trillions, or anything in between.
Ken-G. Johansen.
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Panther
 
Innlegg: 885
Registrert: 06 Aug 2005, 17:12
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